SHARK ISLAND

KERRANG! ISSUE 284 APRIL 1990

LA GUNS, SHARK ISLAND – Sneakers, San Antonio

SHARK ISLAND kicked LA Guns’ butt tonight, only the audience didn’t know it. Sounds silly? Well, I’m sure you’ve all had the experience of being in a concert crowd that would cheer for anything as long as it was played by ‘their band’ – and while LA Guns put on a show that got better and better, the excitement generated was due almost entirely to the energy of their fans.

Shark Island’s set was packed with original songs and cool moves; strutters like ‘Spellbound’ and ‘Get Some Strange’ were fuelled by tall Chris Heilmann’s pumping bass – when this giant tells you to cheer, you cheer! – and Richard Black’s raspy vocals.

All the songs were expertly played and delivered, though the band could still do to get up a few notches on the energy meter. “Here’s a song we wrote by Fleetwood Mac,” they announced before a ballsy rendition of ‘The Chain’, and the classic tune roused Shark Island’s occasionally passive audience rather well. Radio favourite ‘Paris Calling’ set the rowdies waving their beer bottles, and finale ‘Shake For Me’ closed the show on an acceptable wave of howls and handclaps. Less than they deserved, but about what they expected.

The temperature in the nightclub got at least ten degrees hotter during intermission, all due to body heat. And when the lights went out and the first notes of ‘Slap In The Face’, cracked them across the ears, they went into a ; foaming, indiscriminate fist-waving frenzy. The force of the crowd response behind me ruffled my hair; in front were a few rows of scenes from the last days of Sodom and Gomorrah, and then the strangely sedate realm of the stage. Not just sedate in comparison, you understand, as (or much of the show LA Guns did not deliver ‘exciting baIls-to-the-wall rock’ as promised by their PR company.

When songs as potentially gut-shattering as ‘Rip And Tear’ and ‘Sex Action’ fail to deliver, you have to wonder why. It’s not the quality of the musicianship, it’s the attitude that has to exist before the songs are written, before the band jump onstage. LA Guns just aren’t hungry enough often enough.

But once in a while flint strikes stone at just the right angle and you get a haunting performance of ‘Malaria’ or a soulful ‘The Ballad Of Jane’. And then someone with heart – Tracii Guns – finally lets it out and delivers a blues solo that’s sensuous, passionate and just plain good. I didn’t know the dude had so much blood in him.

This was the turning point of the show; sad that it arrived so late, Three songs delivered full throttle, then off into the wings.

The crowd, which hadn’t backed down once, promptly began to chant, scream and stomp its feet. You’ve got to give LA Guns credit for managing to pull in fans like these, but sometimes you have to wonder why such adoration exists. The hard edged ‘One More Reason’, with its release of all the band’s unspent energy, gives me a hint though.
Good for LA Guns if these fans stick around, Good for us if the band gives them a reason to.

MARIBETH BRUNO

LA GUNS

KERRANG! ISSUE 284 APRIL 1990

LA GUNS, SHARK ISLAND – Sneakers, San Antonio

LAGUNS_284

SHARK ISLAND kicked LA Guns’ butt tonight, only the audience didn’t know it. Sounds silly? Well, I’m sure you’ve all had the experience of being in a concert crowd that would cheer for anything as long as it was played by ‘their band’ – and while LA Guns put on a show that got better and better, the excitement generated was due almost entirely to the energy of their fans.

Shark Island’s set was packed with original songs and cool moves; strutters like ‘Spellbound’ and ‘Get Some Strange’ were fuelled by tall Chris Heilmann’s pumping bass – when this giant tells you to cheer, you cheer! – and Richard Black’s raspy vocals.

All the songs were expertly played and delivered, though the band could still do to get up a few notches on the energy meter. “Here’s a song we wrote by Fleetwood Mac,” they announced before a ballsy rendition of ‘The Chain’, and the classic tune roused Shark Island’s occasionally passive audience rather well. Radio favourite ‘Paris Calling’ set the rowdies waving their beer bottles, and finale ‘Shake For Me’ closed the show on an acceptable wave of howls and handclaps. Less than they deserved, but about what they expected.

The temperature in the nightclub got at least ten degrees hotter during intermission, all due to body heat. And when the lights went out and the first notes of ‘Slap In The Face’, cracked them across the ears, they went into a ; foaming, indiscriminate fist-waving frenzy. The force of the crowd response behind me ruffled my hair; in front were a few rows of scenes from the last days of Sodom and Gomorrah, and then the strangely sedate realm of the stage. Not just sedate in comparison, you understand, as (or much of the show LA Guns did not deliver ‘exciting baIls-to-the-wall rock’ as promised by their PR company.

When songs as potentially gut-shattering as ‘Rip And Tear’ and ‘Sex Action’ fail to deliver, you have to wonder why. It’s not the quality of the musicianship, it’s the attitude that has to exist before the songs are written, before the band jump onstage. LA Guns just aren’t hungry enough often enough.

But once in a while flint strikes stone at just the right angle and you get a haunting performance of ‘Malaria’ or a soulful ‘The Ballad Of Jane’. And then someone with heart – Tracii Guns – finally lets it out and delivers a blues solo that’s sensuous, passionate and just plain good. I didn’t know the dude had so much blood in him.

This was the turning point of the show; sad that it arrived so late, Three songs delivered full throttle, then off into the wings.

The crowd, which hadn’t backed down once, promptly began to chant, scream and stomp its feet. You’ve got to give LA Guns credit for managing to pull in fans like these, but sometimes you have to wonder why such adoration exists. The hard edged ‘One More Reason’, with its release of all the band’s unspent energy, gives me a hint though.
Good for LA Guns if these fans stick around, Good for us if the band gives them a reason to.

MARIBETH BRUNO

LYNCH MOB

Kerrang! Issue 284 April 1990

LYNCHMOB_284

Just when you thought it was safe to prowl the aisles of your local record shop…an ex-member of Dokken goes and releases an album! But don’t panic, cos it’s guitarist GEORGE LYNCH with his new band, the ‘real different and very, very cool’ LYNCH MOB. ELIANNE HALBERSBERG hammers on and bends his G-string…

ALL THINGS considered, George Lynch is a happy man, but this is not to imply that he has had a smooth ride of late. He remains tangled up in legal matters over his former affiliation (Dokken), one that ironically enough found him up for a collective Grammy nomination, despite the band having called it quits long before. So, today, George Lynch is out to rebuild his career, but starting over is never easy.

Thus he has assembled Lynch Mob, whose debut album is due for a May release. On vocals is Oni Logan, bass man is former Beggars And Thieves and French Lick member Anthony Esposito, while drum duties are the responsibility of his old Dokken colleague, Mick Brown.

“I don’t consider it my project, even though that’s what the name implies,” the guitarist begins. “it is a band in every sense of the word. The name picked us more than anything else because people were throwing it at me.

“It took me two-and-a-half months to find a singer, three months to find a bass player. I went through 200 videos and tapes, flying guys in and our. There was a lot of criteria to meet.

“When Dokken broke up and we finally acknowledged that it was really over, it took a while to sink in. You fail and you fail your audience as well, because they invest time and belief and then feel used, especially when you break up for petty reasons. Anyway, to avoid at all costs the situation repeating itself, I spent a long time looking for the right people to guarantee built-in longevity.

DOKKEN BROKE up at the end of 1988 and I started writing on my own and looking for people,” continues George. “The stuff I was writing at first sounded very neo-Dokken, but when I found the band members I trashed it and began creating something new.

“I don’t want to sound like I’m hyping it, but it feels so right and unrestrained. In Dokken, I questioned my own motives – ‘Is this what it all adds up to?’. I get off listening to this music, and if something genuinely strikes a chord within us, it should have the same effect on people who listened in the past.”

The obvious question when hearing Lynch speak of questioning his own motives is, if he was so damned miserable, why didn’t he just walk out of the situation?

“I wasn’t miserable. I always had hope that we could resolve our problems -and things did get better. I don’t like giving up, I like to make things work. I wish I could have stepped out after accomplishing what we set out to do, but six years, six albums, building up ourselves, the fans, right at the point of headlining, which we owed ourselves.., to disband was unfair.

“Mick and I stayed together and assumed Jeff (Pilson, Dokken bassist) would play with us, although he went on to do his own thing and that’s fine. We began looking for the ultimate singer and we found Oni, who was with Ferrari. Once I heard his tape I put all the others in a box in my closet! He was careful and methodical about how he approached us and I felt once he was in he would stay. It took some coaxing. I WANTED to have an image, something Dokken never had,” continues George. “It’s hard to describe, but when we talked with Oni and Anthony, we had common interests and visions. I wanted people with high standards who wouldn’t accept anything less from themselves and would therefore push the rest of the band to keep up to par. I wanted ideals, not just hotshot technicians. ft had to gel and be magic.”

The group enlisted Max Norman and Neil Kernon to produce what is now known as ‘Wicked Sensation’.

Lynch laughs, “We had a lot of phoney titles like ‘No Noose Is Good Noose’ and ‘Hanging Out With The Lynch Mob’. ‘Wicked Sensation’ is the title cut, and we were going to cover ‘Higher Ground’ two weeks before the Chilli Peppers came out with it! A lot of the stuff is like heavy psychedelia. It’s real different, but very, very cool. We stretched out a lot and it’s nastier, but not a Metal record. It’s more gut-level with wicked grooves and more interesting changes.”

Over the course of the Dokken years, Lynch’s technique and signature sound turned him into a guitar hero, to the point where he is now listed as an influence by new bands, or set up as a comparison model in record company press kits.

“I don’t like that,” he states. “I get off on the underdog thing of having to prove myself and it takes the incentive away to hear that stuff, so I play it down. I want to continue to grow and not repeat myself, so that people have a reason to listen. I want to improve not just technically but in different directions, not adopt a style and stay with it for 20 years.

“With this band, I feel liberated in a lot of ways – for instance, doing an acoustic blues song. Before, it was too restrictive; we would do a Dokken album, every song had to count, we wanted to sell a million – there was no room to stretch. A lot of this material is such a departure that it’s refreshing. We had a lot of it in us and didn’t know how to get it out because of the way the band was set up.”

QUERIED AS to what makes him a good guitarist, Lynch fires back, “Who said I was a good guitarist?!”

All right, then – competent.

“I don’t know,” he replies. “First of all you have to put your craft first, which means practising and pushing yourself every day, or else you won’t gain anything. You’ve got to break down the walls and it’s painful. A lot of players get in ruts and it can be permanent if you don’t push. There is a lot of attitude involved and being a pure technician isn’t enough.
“For myself, keeping healthy helps too. A few drinks every now and then isn’t bad compared to the alternatives! That’s my vice, once in a while, but no heroin or cocaine! I cut back on partying because at one point in my life I realised it was detrimental and hurt my playing. It’s also just as bad to be a clinician, to sit and study, study, study and work, work, work because then there is no personality or style in your playing. Back off and let it come through.”

Lynch isn’t the only one who has come to grips with his priorities. To hear him tell it, Brown has also straightened up his act, an accomplishment that, based on reputation, probably has to be seen to be believed.

“Mick has come on light years in playing,” notes Lynch. “To begin with, we recorded some material, 12 songs in a warehouse, and he has just blossomed as a player. Mick hasn’t played like this since we were in the Boyz some 12 or 13 years ago, so he’s all fired up.

“Oni is a great drummer too and I think that also kicks Mick’s butt, knowing that Oni can show him a few things if he wants to! I think he’s more restrained because he feels more responsible for the outcome. He’s in a position of responsibility. We’ve played together for so long and we have more experience than Oni and Anthony, so we’ve got to lead the way and rely on us.”

ASKED HOW his own playing has changed over the years, Lynch remarks,

“Somebody once described it as ‘A flock of wild geese on acid’! Someone else said, ‘Diarrhoea leads – very sporadic and unscheduled’!

“I’m really trying. I’m taking classical lessons and I’m still a dummy when it comes to technique. I play what feels right, though I’ve learned in time to phrase fluidly and fluently. I have learned that the guitar is a way of communication. Before, what I heard in my head I could not get out through my fingers, so I am becoming more accomplished and coming closer to my ideals.”

KIDD COMET

METAL FORCES ISSUE 37 MARCH 1989

KIDD COMET

The first time I saw and read about KIDD COMET was about 9 months ago, when I received Bam Magazine from L.A. When my eyes caught Casey and Co. I was sure that this band was just my cup of tea. I contacted the band and soon received a copy of their debut EP, and a real killer it turned out to be KIDD COMET plays glam with so much power that it puts most other bands of their ilk to shame. I would compare them to early CRUE with a touch of POISON and WHITE LION thrown in for good measure. But to find out more about the KIDD COMET glam clan let’s bring in vocalist Casey Lee Michaels.
Casey, when was the band formed? Tell our readers how it all started?

“Well, in early 1988, I contacted a friend who lived in Los Angeles and ran a musician’s referral service. Ronny (North, guitar) had been playing around with some half-assed rock outfit called JADE, who seemed to have a lot of money but little else. Out of 200 prospective guitarists I chose Ronny and took his photo and bio to the band. We made the necessary phone calls, set up the meeting and exchanged tapes.”

So, who are your influences? “The band holds great respect for and is influenced by too many factors to really bother putting into words, but speaking strictly in the genre of rock music, there is definitely a common KISS bond within the group. I always thought Paul Stanley was the epitome of what a rockstar should be: a great songwriter, great vocalist, and a fantastic stage performer – not to mention that he looks and acts the part.”

How did you come up with the name KIDD COMET? “Comic books were my means of escape as I was growing up, and KIDD COMET was a character I created. Batman had his Robin, Captain America had Bucky etc, so KIDD COMET was the ultimate sidekick, except there was never a partner. The first night we met (the band) we hit it off right away and when the topic of group name came up, I offered KIDD COMET.”

You have just recorded your debut EP, could you tell us more about It? “The debut EP is called, “Kiss….Kiss….Bang! Bang!”, which includes the title track plus, “When it’s Over”’ about a psychotic’s obsession with a girl, “Ignite The Nile”’ which is about an experience I had when I first moved into Hollywood, and “Learn To Live” which offers a story line loosely based on a girlfriend of mine who moved to Hollywood to seek fame and reached a little too far.”

How would you describe your music? “It’s story board rock’n’roll, there’s no deep messages here. It’s escapism. It’s something to help take you away from the boredom of everyday life. It’s something that says ‘It’s Okay To Be You!’. That’s certainly nothing new, it is what it is, a product that gives you KIDD COMET seven days a week, every week.”

How much gigging does the band do? “We try to play out as often as possible, but at the same time you don’t want to flood the market. We’ll do the strip twice a month and concentrate on other venues, it’s a big world out there and L.A. is a very small needle in a very large haystack, an important little needle, but ultimately rock fans are everywhere!

Are you getting interest from any major labels? “Ah yes! The big LA myth. Of course we’ve had our fair share of labels offering us the dotted line, but we’re looking at the big picture – the take two steps back before you shoot picture. We’re in it for the long run, not to be someone’s tax write-off. Demo deals are not record deals, and record deals only count when you’re three records down and still selling strong with a point figure that allows the band to earn a living and not just the record company counting profits. To say the band doesn’t have the material is incorrect – we do. We’re just waiting for the right deal, we want full artistic freedom. KIDD COMET is not a ‘fad’ band. I don’t think you’ll ever see a KIDD COMET rap album!”

Well, as you can see, Casey has certainly got his head screwed on right, and he is ably supported by three talented musicians, namely Ronnie North (guitar), Mark Blaso (bass) and the recently recruited Denny Foxx (drums), and with the right breaks KIDD COMET could well be a name that’s on the tips of everyone’s tongue come the end of the year.

ROZZI LANE

METAL FORCES ISSUE 37 MARCH 1989

ROZZI LANE


ROZZI LANE have been on the LA. scene for quite a while now, although it’s taken me ages to track them down. The band consists of Toni Snow (drums), Michael Marquee (bass), Mickey D’Mone (vocals) and Willy Houston (guitars) and they describe themselves as ‘New Wave’s Bastard Stepchild’ and I certainty wouldn’t be one to argue ‘cos the two songs l have on tape – “Betty Angel” and “Beauty’s Only Skin Deep” – fit that description perfectly.

The nearest band they remind me of is THE RAMONES, but with a more rocking edge. There’s also a bit of SWEET in there as well.

With the wildest and wackiest hairdos in Hollywood – every member has either got pink or orange hair – ROZZI LANE are one of the best and most entertaining live acts I’ve seen in a long time.

I believe the two tracks will be available as a single by the time you read this, so you’d better get writing, ‘cos ROZZI LANE are gonna bigger than their hairdo’s!
KELV HELLRAZER


LINK:

PAIR A DICE

METAL FORCES ISSUE 37 MARCH 1989

PAIR A DICE

Formed in 1986 PAIRADICE are a five-piece melodic hard rock band based in LA. Consisting of Paul Lancia (vocals), Dave Marshall (lead guitar), Billy D’vette (rhythm guitar), Nick Masella (bass) and Dazz Bash (drums), the bands demo contains three tracks which show their ability to write strong, catchy tunes which should grab the attention of a few A&R executives on the West Coast.

“I’ll Be There For You” is a moody ballad that oozes class. “Where’s Jenny” is an uptempo rocker with plenty of melody, whilst the pacey “Midnight Train” features some great lead work from Dave Marshall. Add to this the superb vocals of Paul Lancia, whose style is quite unique, and you have a real happening band who should be checked out at all costs.
KEN ANTHONY


Link

From the Pair A Dice Youtube channel

http://www.youtube.com/user/PAIRADICE88

JUNGLE ALLEY

METAL FORCES ISSUE 37 MARCH 1989

JUNGLE ALLEY


JUNGLE ALLEY is bassist Gary J. Corso’s (ex-ROCKNEE) new act. Joining Gary is his brother Joee (lead guitar), Steve Phillips (lead guitar), Muke Russo (drums) and Bump Scott (lead vocals).

“Ready” hits off the demo in fine AEROSMITH-like style. “Too Loose For Love” has some killer axework from Joee and Steve with the whole song structured around a kind of funky, but really meaty riff.

“Even Though” is a ballad reminiscent of “Sweet Child O’ Mine”, where Bump Scott’s vocals and the band’s harmonies come across exceptionally strong.
‘Tired Of Your Love” has a more commercial feel to it with keyboards and a memorable chorus, plus some more excellent dual axework.

Finally, ‘On My Way” has a mid-west rock’n’roll feel to it and closes a happening demo.

JUNGLE ALLEY has been working with Tony Thompson of the POWERSTATION and keyboard extraordinaire, Jeff Loiter who helped produce this demo, and I’m sure the band will be tearin’ up L.A. by the time you read this.
KELV HELLRAZER

Jungle Alley from their  myspace page

http://www.myspace.com/junglealley

 

 

BILLIONAIRE BOYS CLUB

METAL FORCES ISSUE 37 MARCH 1989

BILLIONAIRE BOYS CLUB

 
BILLIONAIRE BOYS CLUB is none other than my old buddy Nigel Itson (ex-LONDON/RUBY SLIPPERS). “After the demise of RUBY SLIPPERS, it was pretty obvious that l wasn’t going to make it doing the OTT glamour thing,” explains Nigel, “so I decided that l would do the thing by myself.

I found four scum buckets that were already in a band and we formed MILLIONAIRE BOYS CLUB, but due to inflation we changed it to BILLIONAIRE!”

Being a big tan of Nigel I couldn’t wait to get my lugholes around his latest affair.

“Sealed With A Kiss” hits off the demo, and is Nigel at his trashiest yet, being backed up by the weirdest bunch of junkie punks I’ve seen in a long time – in the form of Robert Tracy (guitars), Billy (guitars), James Frey (bass) and Tony Purvis (drums). It’s not surprising the band sound trashy.

“Twinkle Twinkle” is the glamiest anthem around, Nigel turning in his finest vocal performance to date. “You Girl” is another glamour anthem of the finest order, showing Nigel’s MOTT influences.

I think Nigel stands a better chance than ever before with B.B.C., the image Is more streetwise, which will help ‘cos a lot of people were offended by RUBY SUPPERS – sometimes they were just too OTT.
KELV HELLRAZER

RUBY SLIPPERS MYSPACE

http://www.myspace.com/rubyslippersrock/music

CINDERELLA

Feature from Blast! Magazine May 1987

Whenever anybody tells you a Cinderella story, you know there’s a happy ending coming. This Cinderella story has a happy beginning, but the happy ending is nowhere in sight! Tom Keifer, frontlips and persona of this two-million-plus-selling band is the type of guy you need to unpuzzle in order to get a clear picture of him.

To his right, pretty blond bass player Eric Brittingham (blonds have more fun, and men don’t deserve that much hair.., ); to his left, Jeff LaBar, a Eurasian Jake E. Lee-type- looking guitarist, and behind him, stickslugger Fred Coury. That’s the picture you get when the band is on stage. Off stage, the scene is pretty quiet, especially when you leave it up to Tom. Tom likes peace and quiet and misses his home, he says. March 2, 1987 – who on earth would leave California to go to freezing cold Indianapolis… if it weren’t to see the hottest show touring the country right now?!

The Bon Jovi/Cinderella tour is selling out like hotcakes everywhere, but today is special for the fans, as well as for Jon Bon Jovi, who celebrates his 25th birthday!

Officially, Cinderella has been around for four years; in reality, the band, as we know them now, for about two years. Tom Keifer formed and guided the band through various lineups, along with Eric Brittingham. About two years ago, when Jeff LaBar joined Tom and Eric, things started looking up. The last necessary amendment took place last year when Fred Coury joined them on drums – all major changes for a new band that was scheduled to record a first album, and a scary prospect for four guys who hadn’t really played together that long.

Call it luck, call it timing, call it whatever you want. Very few bands make it as big as Cinderella has right from the beginning, and this band is definitely going places. I’ve seen the band perform six times so far, and I’m impressed, They have improved so much since the first time I saw them on the DLR tour. It spells “success…


Tom, Jeff, Fred and yours truly squeezed together in the time of arrival of the pizza delivery boy!

Tom speaks softly (as in, shove the tape recorder under his mouth!), and although he realizes that interviews are dreadful things that need to be done, I’m sure, while he was talking to me, he was fantasizing about a king-size bed, blinds closed shut, phones off the hook and a never ending sleep.

Sorry, Tom, That happens only in “Cinderella-land”!

The band is thrilled with their newfound success. They love playing live, but all three admit to having a hard time adjusting to life on the road and living out of a suitcase for seven months.

Tom has Cinderella’s career well planned out, and nothing is left to chance. That’s why he says the band waited to tour until an offer came along that would give them the opportunity to cover as much ground as quickly as possible. That offer came from DLR, and who’s more road-wise than David Lee Roth?

Despite the band’s huge following, they’re not striking out on their own on a headlining tour yet. “It’s still not the right time,” Tom explains. “You can sell a lot of records really quickly because of exposure on TV and radio, but that only means that you’ve entertained the listeners and viewers for a mere three minutes, When it comes down to concerts, you’re talking about entertaining them for an hour, and it takes a little more time to prove yourself.”

Their new video clip for “Somebody Save Me,” the one where Tom demonstrates some superb wolf-howling, features Jon Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora, and they’re getting the girls. Neither Jon nor Richie is in need of extra exposure. That means there’s more to it than meets the eye. “That’s true,” admits Tom. Usually our manager comes up with the video concepts, but we really got heavily involved in the ‘Save Me’ video. We were supposed to have a guest star, Sam Kinison, a comedian, but it all fell through when Sam called up 20 minutes before the shoot and said he didn’t want to do it. Needless to say, we had to figure out something else to do fast.”

Was that when it occurred to them that Jon and Richie had a day off, maybe; therefore, they should be ordered on the set, without auditioning them first, I want to know? “Sort of…laughs Jeff.

How would Tom describe his fellow band members? “A***holes!… Oops! Strike that from the record!” he laughs. “Well, since they’re sitting here next to me, let’s see… Fred is the one who keeps things always light and on a humorous note. He’s the comedian in the band. He will speak up immediately whenever there is anything wrong. He’s a good guy…

“Jeff is an observer. He comes up with some great stuff when you least expect it. In the studio, he would pick up on things that were going by everybody else. He’d say, ‘No, you stupid idiots! Not that… this!’.., after we were looking to correct something for three hours! He’s real good that way.

“Eric’s definitely the nit-picker of the band. Eric could find fault with one million dollars. You could give him a briefcase with one million dollars in it, and they would be the wrong size bills, He looks for very small details as opposed to the general whole picture of the situation.” Now Tom had his fun… how do the others feel about Tom? “He’s a leader that you wouldn’t think of as a leader,” states Fred. “You can ask him questions anytime, and he’ll always give you a straight answer. He always knows exactly the direction he’s going and doesn’t screw around with the stupid stuff. He’s the Leonard Nimoy of the band. In search of….! He’s smart!”

“He’s the smartest motherf***er I’ve ever met in my life,” adds Jeff. “He knows what he’s doing!”

Say no more.., these little quotes have secured their jobs for at least another year!

The immediate future plans include another video shoot, for “Nightsongs,” and after the American tour ends on July 15, Tom will have his long-overdue and well-deserved sleep in his own bed in his own house. When August rolls around, the band will again join Bon Jovi on the European leg of the tour, starting with the Castle Donnington Festival, followed by the Monsters of Rock tour throughout Europe. In the fall, the band will go back in the studio to record their follow-up album for an early 1988 release.

KISS

KERRANG! ISSUE 30 – DECEMBER 1982

BLINK AND blink again. Above is the picture you thought you’d never see: Ace Frehley, less hirsuite than normal but unmistakable nonetheless, decked out in full stage regalia and nestling nonchalantly within the Kiss ranks.

As you’re no doubt aware, rumours surrounding the guitarist have flown fast and furious of late, some claiming he’d gone solo others that he’d just (hic) gone, but all have been staunchly denied by management and band, who could now be excused for collectively dubbing their forthcoming post-Xmas dates the ‘We Told You So Tour’.

Personally, I’m still not convinced that Ace, despite getting sleeve space for his features, plays on ‘Creatures Of The Night’, Kiss’ latest, strictly metallic, offering but there can now no question that the other-galactic one will continue to play out his fantasy role to the hilt, plans to introduce another guitarist at the side of the stage (Steve Casey in drag?) having been firmly knocked on the head.

“Actually, Ace is lucky to be alive, “reveals Paul Stanley over the Kerrang! hot-line. “He didn’t really want people to know but he had a very bad car accident a few months back and completely totalled his Porsche. He’s still in pain and has a bit of trouble ‘whiplashing’, but at least he’s in one piece.”

Despite this dramatic, real-life reconstruction of ‘Detroit Rock City’, however, the band have lined up a heavy touring schedule that should keep them busy for most of next year. Originally, they were due to play some South American shows but for political reasons these have had to be cancelled and Alberqueque, New Mexico, on December 27, is now the opening date, heralding a further 99 gigs over a five month period. Kiss’ first US tour in some three years it’ll see the four playing 8-20,000-seaters and taking in places they haven’t shaken since the early the days.

Older, harder material has now been introduced – ‘I Want You’ not performed live since ‘77, will certainly feature and ‘Deuce’ and ‘I Stole Your Love’ have been rehearsed – as well as a new metallic stage (right), recently unveiled for nigh on 300 media persons at a press conference (!) in Los Angeles where these pics were taken. As you can gather, the theme is a military one, a tank to be precise, the turret and gun (which works, I’m assured) acting as a base for Eric Carr’s drums and the treads, illuminated naturally, flanking the stage on either side.

This setup, which probably won’t be seen in Europe till late next year, perfectly complements the ‘Creatures Of The Night’ album in reflecting a new-found hunger and aggression within the Kiss ranks. No more compromises, no more half-measures.. . and definitely no synths!

“Our road crew have direct orders to kill all synth players that approach the stage, “warns Gene Simmons. “Our aim, as it’s always been, is to get up onstage and put on the greatest rock ‘n’ roll show in the world!”
(to be continued – without a doubt).
DANTE BONUTTO